Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Saguaro Cactus and the Mysterious Sonoran Desert


The Native Americans of the Sonoran Desert are very in tune with the nature in this region. They look at the land as your relative and if you throw trash on the land you are throwing trash on your relatives. When we die we go back into the earth so let's take care of it as best we can.

The saguaro cactus and the Sonoran Desert are very sacred and mysterious to the Tohono O'odham Indian people. These cacti are thought to be people and if you look long enough especially at dusk or dawn...they truly look like people. My kids said that at night these cactus walk around and when morning comes they go back to their spot. I can just picture it...can't you?

The fruit of the saguaro cactus are very important as well. When the natives harvest the fruit of the saguaro it is so important it is considered their New Year. They use the fruit to make jam, syrup and even wine. The Sonoran desert may seem like a prickly and desolate waste land but in fact it is filled with life. So many animals, insects, rodents and reptiles live in the desert and let's not to forget the hundreds of varieties of plants. I would love to see the desert in bloom someday...I think it would be spectacular!

The size of cactus shown in the picture is approximately 100-150 years old...isn't it incredible? He also looks like he is alongside the road hitch hiking his way to California or some other exotic destination.

I just love being amongst these quirky cacti...Make sure to stop at Saguaro National Park if you are ever in the Tucson area. I don't think you will be disappointed unless you were here in the middle of the summer and hit a day of 114 degree temperatures.



Until next time...Anne

2 comments:

  1. I really love the saquaro cactus as well and what better place to see them then the National Park. I have been working with some folks that have been transplanting the Saquaro's in their restoration projects. Tess

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  2. Love the "hitch-hiking saquaro! I saw them the first time on a trip from Phoenix to Sedona. Fascinating!

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